Masters Summer Project

I have neglected to update the site for a while. Having completed our second semester of the masters degree I am undertaking, to be finished in August this year, I have spent almost exclusively all of my time capturing images and editing images, and learning and perfecting layout using Adobe InDesign, Lightroom, Illustrator and Photoshop. It has been a great experience learning to use these tools effectively and efficiently. My second semester final project was a full 96 page magazine, completed by myself using entirely my own photography and my own researched and written, scientific articles. I am very proud of the result and will post up images from the magazine in due course.

Now we are working on our final summer projects for completion of the masters, and my subject is a local National Trust estate, Calke Abbey. I am spending eight weeks taking images at the estate including some of its wildlife – invertebrates, birds, mammals, plants and trees – its old gardens and buildings and some of the internal rooms of the house itself. It is proving to be an enjoyable and rewarding project thus far. The final result will be a book to be printed and submitted for marking by August.

So far I have layout and many of the images needed, although far from all of them. Birds and mammals are proving more difficult than trees, plants and insects, for obvious reasons. Invertebrate photography is not as straightforward as it seems, as they are always on the move and it’s a fine line which aperture to use to capture as much detail of the insect as possible while maintaining nice bokeh and background.

Some of these images were taken while working on the summer project, and I will be adding more in time. They give a general idea of the images which will be included, however none of these will be included in the book, as I have many others.

Chasing light: September/October 2018

At the end of September I started a Masters course in Biological Photography and Imaging. This has meant a huge shift in terms of comfort levels when using my camera. My obsession with AV mode on the Canon EOS 5D Mk III has been fixed!

We have a number of assignment deadlines coming up already, but I have managed to get out and about both on the incorporated field trips and in my spare (haha) time. Here are a few images from our various trips and my own trips out.

 

Focus Stack-attack (Invertebrates)

As part of my Advanced Method Zoology module, we undertook some imaging coursework. This involved photomacrography, photomicrography and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) work. I decided to try the focus stacking at home instead, as I can focus much more in my own surroundings. The subject of my work was Odonata (dragonflies) and I had a few specimens to photograph.

I used the Canon 100mm macro lens, which is quite probably the best lens ever for macro work (biased opinion). I have learnt how to focus stack, kinda, and it’s so much fun. I recommend it!