Flora: May/June 2019

I am planning to create a business using my photography, editing, layout and writing skills. It would be lovely to think that I could work on a magazine creation (possibly of my own) and make a living from it, but that would be unlikely. It won’t stop me from creating my own magazine and sharing it with anyone who wants to read it. Selling images as prints for framing or selling images for commercial use or as stock photography is definitely something a photographer can fairly easily do to earn some cash. I need to make a living from this thing I love doing but I’m struggling to see how it’s possible.

How on earth does a student photographer see their way through to selling their work for a living?

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Chasing light: September/October 2018

At the end of September I started a Masters course in Biological Photography and Imaging. This has meant a huge shift in terms of comfort levels when using my camera. My obsession with AV mode on the Canon EOS 5D Mk III has been fixed!

We have a number of assignment deadlines coming up already, but I have managed to get out and about both on the incorporated field trips and in my spare (haha) time. Here are a few images from our various trips and my own trips out.

 

Focus

I can’t decide if I prefer the previously posted image of the lilies where I’ve focused on the petals, or the image here where the focus was on a tiny point on a stamen, and the rest of the image has a blurred quality. I love the colours and shapes. Suspect I prefer the blurred version here, with shallow depth of field, as it feels more artistic and subjective.

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Dahlia Dreaming

I never liked dahlias when I was studying horticulture at Royal Horticultural Society levels and learning all the plant names. I found them blousy and showy and over-the-top – not subtle in any way, unlike my favoured hardy geraniums. Well, they are all of those things… but I have grown to appreciate their blousiness and brashness! Their symmetry is impressive and can stop you in your tracks and lead you to wonder how nature achieves such perfection in a flower. And they are great to take macro captures of.