Precious little Simba came to us from a cat rescue after being found as a stray. He is smaller than the other cats, with the loudest purr. It was a rainy day when I caught him sitting looking wistfully out of the window. With my nifty fifty lens, I managed to catch some nice bokeh too.


Focus Stack-attack (Invertebrates)

As part of my Advanced Method Zoology module, we undertook some imaging coursework. This involved photomacrography, photomicrography and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) work. I decided to try the focus stacking at home instead, as I can focus much more in my own surroundings. The subject of my work was Odonata (dragonflies) and I had a few specimens to photograph.

I used the Canon 100mm macro lens, which is quite probably the best lens ever for macro work (biased opinion). I have learnt how to focus stack, kinda, and it’s so much fun. I recommend it!

Moon Phase: 28th December 2017

I took the new (second-hand) lens out into the garden to try to capture a closer shot of the moon than my very old 75-300mm lens used to allow. I stacked three of the clearest shots in Z stacker. I’m not sure how effective that was, as the stacked final only looks marginally clearer than the original sharpest image. I have compared it with an old shot of the moon I took in September with my old 75-300mm lens.

I’m looking forward to taking more images of the moon, on clearer night than this (it was a bit hazy).

The original images (below) was f/9, 1/100, ISO 100, at 400mm on a semi-cloudy night.

2017-12-29-00.21.13 ZS DMap-1_FINAL


Been messing about with aperture again. I have to say that aperture experiments are addictive, as is focus stacking. Yes, I’ve discovered focus stacking. I can’t put up some of my images yet as they are part of my coursework for my BSc. Zoology (Adv. Zoology module) – these will be uploaded at a later date – but I was messing about with some of these Physalis from my garden. Here’s a couple of unusual focus shots and my first ever focus stacked image. My technique needs a lot of work.

‘Tis the season to be rutting.

I went out into the field to try to catch some action shots of the Red deer and Fallow deer in Calke park, Derbyshire, as the males begin to demonstrate sexual fitness in autumn, select mates/mate and defend harems. I didn’t manage to catch any rutting on this occasion, although there were a couple of individuals with obvious wounds from fighting, and plenty of strutting about and bellowing taking place. I did find some sleepy individuals who were obviously not interested and for whom it all looked like far too much drama and effort! Other individuals were busy practising locking antlers with low hanging branches of trees and rolling in mud, and running around a lot looking quite magnificent.