Spring is sprung

I found a new hide yesterday. Great little find nearby, with so many species frequenting the feeders – including two Great Spotted Woodpeckers at one point! I was excited, it’s true, and spent an hour or so with the camera trying to get some decent captures. However, I was limited in light levels as, by the time I found the hide, it was beginning to darken. To up my shutter speed meant losing depth of field, and I do like my DoF… so I left the camera in AV mode and did my best with low light.

Many blurred images later, I have concluded I need to visit this hide in lighter hours, and use TV mode more for wildlife shots to obtain the really sharp results I want! I managed to get a few sharp(ish) shots, however, and have used LR to adjust the sharpness and shadows in the relevant areas. Here is a small selection – a Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus), a Goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis) and Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major pinetorum).

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Bradgate Park

Some time ago we spent a lovely summer’s day at Bradgate Park. It is an historic site having been closed off as an estate for hunting since 1281, but once open as part of the Charnwood Forest and having had bronze and iron age settlements recorded on the site. In 1445 the estate was owned by the Grey family, an influential family in Medieval and Tudor England. The family married into English Royalty, culminating in Lady Jane Grey’s birth in 1537 at Bradgate House within the estate. She was proclaimed Queen of England in 1553, a reign which lasted only nine days. Lady Jane Grey was executed for treason after being overthrown by Mary I.

The estate was passed to the people of Leicestershire by an industrialist who bought it from the then Lady Grey, the estate having grown in size to 1300 acres. Much of the site has since been designated a SSSI.  Bradgate House is an unfortified brick-built country house with modifications added over the years, and it is now mostly in ruins. The extensive land appears to be well managed and protected. There are herds of fallow and red deer grazing on the land which have evidently been preserved as individual genetic lines on the same land for centuries due to the park being closed off from migrating herds. During my time there is saw birds of prey, and many Corvids on the park, along with egrets and various ducks.

Twycross Zoo 2017 Pt. II

We had a visit to Twycross Zoo as part of my BSc. Zoology and Film degree course. I have to admit, I slightly fell in love with the Yellow-throated Martens…and of course, the Meerkats. The Bush Dogs are full of character, but don’t look like they care much for humans. They definitely have an attitude! The pelicans were incredibly photogenic on the water.

Twycross Zoo 2017 Pt. I

I don’t agree with most zoos. I don’t agree with the principle of most zoos. Animals are not human entertainment. I hope that some of these images make it clear why animals do not belong in zoos. More to follow.

I’m fully manual on a 60D with a 75-300mm zoom lens in this case. I used the largest aperture I could with auto ISO, and had some nice light. Light always makes the difference.

Birds Above Industry

I watched a flock of pigeons drift about in the evening sky for over ten minutes. They didn’t land in all that time. They rose and fell, clustered together and fell apart, circled and circled and finally, eventually landed on the roof of the buildings they were roosting on for the night. Those buildings provided a stark contrast to the soft skies and delicate silhouette of birds – they were flying above the steel, glass and concrete buildings of Rolls Royce headquarters in Derby, UK. I deliberately cut out the buildings.

It was a bit of a meditative experience, just watching their motion as a group, coming together and drifting apart, over and over. The image taken is a little meditative for me too – all greys and blues, with a drift of birds floating across the sky in the lower half of the image, while heavy clouds loom above them. I quite like it.

RR Birds